Entrepreneur Simplified with Kim Flynn

Entrepreneur Simplified with Kim Flynn – Tactical Social MediaTactical Social Media.

Entrepreneur Simplified with Kim Flynn, Seattle, 18 August 2015

I’m not normally one to help promote or sponsor workshops, but every so often something well worth my time crosses my desk – in this case my email (and yes I am being compensated to promote this event).

Ad: #THIS ISN’T AN EVENT. THIS IS A WORKSHOP….and it’s FREE. #Seattle

I’ve been a small business owner for more than 18 years and know full well the limitations of time and financial resources typically available. I also know solopreneurs, small business owners and budding entrepreneurs have expertise in what they do or offer, not always in how to run, market or grow their business.  Sometimes they just need a set of fresh eyes to get them back on track.  In too many cases women have an additional unfair advantage.  Enter Kim Flynn!

To help women (and a few brave men), she created the Plug & Play Business System. Every month Kim and her team of expert coaches host 2-4 live workshops in cities all over the nation teaching the basics of how to get your company on track. Their workshops are always free  which means spots fill up quick!  They teach things like marketing, product development, finance, leadership and so much more.

This is your opportunity to COME OVERHAUL YOUR BUSINESS WITH US!  

Entrepreneur Simplified Intensive Business Workshop with Kim Flynn, Seattle, 18 August 2015

When the email came in from Kim’s staff (a direct result of my LinkedIn profile and activity – Hint!), I was more than willing to help promote her event in Seattle next month (as well as a few others).  I’ve always admired Kim.  Her passion and desire to help others are amazing.  My good friend of more than 16 years, MJ Jensen (IdeaMagic Visionary Marketing), has this to say about Kim Flynn:

“Kim Flynn is a motivation Rock Star! If you’re ready for real, life changing, passionate solutions then Kim is your gal. She is a magnet for people who are ready to take their business and their life to a new stratosphere. Her results speak for themselves. Don’t miss experiencing the one and only Kim Flynn in person.”

In this two hour event, it is time to pull up the sleeves and get to work. Kim Flynn and her team will teach you how to systematize, structure and get your company on the track to success. There is ZERO fluff, all content and 100% implementation. It is going to change your world.

We work with people who are ready to OVERHAUL their business. If this idea scares you, you aren’t ready for us quite yet. If it excites you, SIGN UP and welcome to the rest of your life!

Ad: Seattle! This is your opportunity to COME OVERHAUL YOUR BUSINESS WITH US…For FREE”

Posted in Marketing & Social Media

The Cars Of Proctor

The Cars Of Proctor
and the North End of Tacoma

Having recently moved to the Proctor District in the North End of Tacoma recently it didn’t take much to fall in love with this place.  The history, the sense of community, the local businesses and the people truly make Proctor a home.

Being in walking or biking distance from the water (kayak time), Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium (and the rest of Point Defiance Park), shopping and restaurants in Proctor as well as Old Town means more exercise.

Our neighbors are always outside.  We chat almost daily and everyone is more than happy to say hello or good morning, especially on our Sunday morning walk to Metropolitan Market for coffee.

We’re close to downtown, the museums, shopping and the Tacoma Dome for events and shows.

What’s most fascinating about this place – the cars.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Very much absent from here are the high end and luxury brands.  In fact, the new cars are small Fords and other simple, get from point A to point B ones. No extravagance. No “keeping up with the Jonses”.

I was recently reading an article about the lack of cars from my era – the 70s and 80s.  The cars I learned to drive.  The ones I always wanted.  There are usually plenty of collectibles and antiques anywhere but it’s the collection from this time period, some in immaculate condition and others worn and beaten, that call Proctor home which draw my eye.

I’d love your comments and if you can add information from Make to Model to year along with any unique facts, I’d love it.

I’m all about networking and meeting new people. I’m always happy to connect online and if you’re in the Tacoma, WA or South Sound Area, I’d enjoy meeting over a good cup of coffee to chart about social media or life in general.    The coffee is on me!

In the meantime, enjoy my personal thoughts and ramblings.

Robert

Posted in Personal Musings | Tagged , , ,

The Move To Tactical Social Media

As of 1 January 2015 I began posting my social media content at Tactical Social Media.
As of 1 July 2015 I’ll start posting more personal content here.

#BeSocial #BeTactical; Tactical Social Media, a Tacoma, WA social media marketing agency

If you are a subscriber to this blog you can continue to I’d love to have you join me at my new home, subscribe to my newsletter or join the Tactical Social Media Facebook group to keep current on my content.

I’m all about networking and meeting new people. I’m always happy to connect online and if you’re in the Tacoma, WA or South Sound Area, I’d enjoy meeting over a good cup of coffee to chart about social media or life in general.    The coffee is on me!

In the meantime, enjoy my personal thoughts and ramblings.

Robert

 

Posted in Marketing & Social Media

The LinkedIn Messaging Protocol (Revisited)

This post can now be found in it’s entirety at Tactical Social Media.
It was originally published on 29 December 2014.

I like LinkedIn.  It’s a great networking tool and every bit as powerful as face to face networking opportunities both in group and one on one meetings.  LinkedIn offers the ability to showcase one’s expertise, create authority and build great business and personal relationships.

Sadly, I’ve seen a shift over the past few years to more sales pitches in the form of status updates and messages, connections being made for that sole purpose and more bulk messages.  While bulk messages in themselves aren’t always a negative, when you’re looking to strengthen the relationships you have already established, lumping me in with 20+ other ‘Robert’s in your contacts is certainly not a positive way to connect with me.

While bulk #LinkedIn messages in themselves aren't always a negative, when you’re looking to strengthen the relationships you have already established, lumping me in with 20+ other ‘Robert’s in your contacts is certainly not a positive way to connect with me.

Continue Reading at Tactical Social Media.

You can also find this discussion and comment on Google+Pinterest, LinkedIn and Facebook or simply Tweet your thoughts!  If you found this post helpful please share it as others might too.

If you need help building out your LinkedIn profile, learning how to better leverage LinkedIn to showcase your expertise, create authority and build great business and personal relationships and ultimately grow your business or simply have a question, I’d love to chat over a good cup of coffee – and the coffee is on me!

To schedule a consultation or to book me for a workshop or speaking engagement, I can be reached at robert@tacticalsocialmedia.org.

Social Media Strategist | Consultant | Educator | Marketer | Speaker; Focused on HOW to leverage social media, not just master the platforms.Robert Nissenbaum is a successful small business owner with more than 20 years of marketing and sales experience.  Using the same social media and traditional marketing techniques he leveraged to brand and drive revenue for his own businesses, he works with other small to medium-sized business owners to do the same.  His methodology is based on his own practical experience leveraging inbound and outbound platforms with a revolutionary approach and philosophy.  His methods have been applied successfully to retail, service and non-profit based organizations.

        Follow Robert: Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Facebook; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Google+; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; LinkedIn; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Pinterest; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Twitter; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; WordPress Blog; Tactical Social Media  Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Instagram; Tactical Social Media

Posted in LinkedIn, Marketing & Social Media | Tagged , , , ,

The Facebook “Dislike’ Button Conundrum

Within the past month there have been several announcements of major changes planned by Facebook.  There is another change being considered by Mark Zuckerberg – the Dislike button (Thank you Limelight Marketing Consultants for sharing the original Mashable article.)

Most of us have wanted and asked for this for some time.  We all see those posts in our feed we simply do not like.  Then there are those posts that you want to acknowledge but feel conflicted about actually liking – the post about a death, a hospital admittance – something negative happening to a friend.

The Facebook Dislike Button Conundrum; The issue for us at Tactical Social Media, as a social media consultants, is the effect such a button COULD have on business pages and how to mitigate it.

 

The Effect of the Dislike Button On Page Reach

The issue for me, as a social media consultant, is the effect such a button COULD have on business pages and how to mitigate it.  Scroll through your feed now and you generally won’t see many posts by pages.  Pages have been pushed down in an effort to drive ad and promotional revenue by page owners (Facebook will now be targeting overly promotional posts; one of those recent changes) and adding a ‘dislike’ button could further limit that reach.

Currently pages deal with something Facebook refers to as negative feedback.  Users have the ability to hide posts (and even paid ads) from pages as they appear in their feed.  That hide feature also allows users to unfollow a page.  This is different than ‘unliking’ the page.  Unfollow means the page still shows as ‘Liked’ but nothing posted will show in your feed.  Both are seen as negative feedback to Facebook and affect that page’s future reach.  Worse yet, those features affect other pages posting similar content.  While they may not receive negative feedback, their organic reach will suffer just the same.

So how will the dislike button affect page visibility?  Hard to say.  It could end up being a simpler way to hide a particular post and making it easier may mean more hidden pages and worse reach.  It could play out as the opposite and simply add a level of engagement to a post similar to a “Like” or “comment” helping the page owner.  Better still, this would provide yet another opportunity for the page owner to engage with user and would serve to provide better feedback as to the type of posting users want to see.  It could also fall out somewhere in the middle.

The Bottom Line:

Regardless of the effect, as with the promotional post and copyright policy (as it affects posted images) updates, if you have been posting tactically and with a good strategy in place, providing value and content your audience wants, the dislike button should have no real impact on your post or page visibility.

I’d love your thoughts on the idea of a Facebook Dislike button.  You can comment below or you can find this discussion and comment on Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Facebook or simply Tweet your thoughts!  If you found this post helpful please share it as others might too.

If you do not have a trusted strategy in place, you’re not sure about the content or value you provide, you’re concerned you’re may not posting using sound tactics and these changes worry you, I’d love to meet for an initial consultation over a good cup of coffee – no obligation and the coffee is on me. 

To schedule a consultation or to book me for a workshop or speaking engagement, I can be reached at robert@tacticalsocialmedia.org.

Social Media Strategist | Consultant | Educator | Marketer | Speaker; Focused on HOW to leverage social media, not just master the platforms.Robert Nissenbaum is a successful small business owner with more than 20 years of marketing and sales experience.  Using the same social media and traditional marketing techniques he leveraged to brand and drive revenue for his own businesses, he works with other small to medium sized business owners to do the same.  His methodology is based on his own practical experience leveraging inbound and outbound platforms with a revolutionary approach and philosophy.  His methods have been applied successfully to retail, service and non profit based organizations.

        Follow Robert: Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Facebook; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Google+; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; LinkedIn; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Pinterest; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Twitter; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; WordPress Blog; Tactical Social Media  Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Instagram; Tactical Social Media

 

 

Posted in Facebook, Marketing & Social Media | Tagged , ,

The Social Media Employment Entanglement

Social Media & Workforce Equality

I normally write from the perspective of teaching how business owners need to think about leveraging social media to drive branding, sales and ultimately revenue. I want to switch that up a little and tackle another aspect of social media usage: how businesses use, or maybe shouldn’t use social media with respect to their employees and potential employees. – Continue reading at Tactical Social Media

To schedule a consultation or to book me for a workshop or speaking engagement, I can be reached at Tactical Social Media

Social Media Strategist | Consultant | Educator | Marketer | Speaker; Focused on HOW to leverage social media, not just master the platforms.I am a successful small business owner with more than 20 years of marketing and sales experience.  Using the same social media and traditional marketing techniques I leveraged to brand and drive revenue for my own businesses, I work with other small to medium-sized business owners to do the same.  My methodology is based on my own practical experience leveraging inbound and outbound platforms with a revolutionary approach and philosophy.  My methods have been applied successfully to retail, service and non-profit based organizations.

        You can follow me on Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Facebook Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Google+ Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; LinkedIn Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Pinterest Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Twitter Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; WordPress Blog  Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Instagram.        

Posted in Marketing & Social Media | Tagged ,

The Facebook Promotional Post Complication

Facebook Rules will Hurt Businesses

“….as of mid-January, the social network will intensify its efforts to filter out unpaid promotional material in user news feeds that businesses have posted as status updates.”

Facebook to limit overly promotional posts in news feeds.

#Facebook Rules will Hurt Businesses  “….as of mid-January, the social network will intensify its efforts to filter out unpaid promotional material in user news feeds that businesses have posted as status updates.”  Facebook to limit overly promotional posts in news feeds.

The typical first thought by most Facebook page owners on the new policy: My businesses will be hurt by this change and how am I going to promote my product / service and get it seen?

My first thought: Had you been utilizing Facebook as social media was intended, this change wouldn’t matter.

It sounds harsh but the stark reality of the situation is Facebook (and any other social platform) was not designed to be an in your face, outbound marketing tool.  Granted it works that way for many, but those activities are best left to email blasts, direct mail and radio – traditional outbound marketing channels.  Using social media as an outbound tool defeats its true value.

Social media is about building relationships and social interaction.  It should be utilized as an avenue allowing your clients and customers to reach you.  Social media is an inbound channel.  The move on Facebook’s part, while it may be seen as a huge negative and a means of capitalizing on the user base (something they have a right to do) is actually GOOD for business.

Strict outbound efforts do not generate loyalty, trust or build relationships.  They attract customers focused on price or ‘the deal of the day’.  They’ll likely pass you over for a better deal even hours after buying from you.  Survival and growth requires a long term approach.  It requires you to bond with your clients and customers.  They need to WANT to buy from you.  While price and quality contribute to that sentiment, factors such as respect, trust, developing a personal connection, that sense of liking your business enough to want to invite it to their family Sunday dinner, ultimately carries more weight.

You already have the outbound channels for the steals and deals.  You should be using Facebook to drive the social aspect.  The end goal is properly leveraging each channel to work together to find, close and retain your customer base.

My belief that Facebook should be used as an outbound tool doesn’t preclude you from using it to sell, and I am a proponent of social selling.  It means filtering in your sales and promotions, product announcements and other assorted specials and to do so in a manner that doesn’t read ‘Buy Me Now’ every other post.

A Final Thought:

In the end, this will not likely affect too many users and it remains to be seen if Facebook is strictly going after those that ONLY post ‘advertisements’ and use the platform for driving numbers or if all promotional posts will be hidden from feeds.  (How Facebook defines ‘promotion’)

Regardless, the change in policy doesn’t mean having to abandon the practice or be forced to pay for it (at least not yet).  It does, however, require rethinking how you post those overly promotional messages and drive direct sales.  A proper strategy will allow for direct sales pitches to be seen, but also grow your other social channels while increasing web traffic, SEO and your email subscribers.

I’d love to hear your thoughts.  You can comment below or you can find this post and comment on Google+Pinterest and Facebook or simply Tweet your thoughts!  If you found this post helpful please share it as others might too.

_____________________________________________________________________________

If you are interested in learning more on HOW to refocus and refine your strategy to use Facebook as it was intended and still leverage your fan base to drive sales, comment here or on any of the social media conversations.  I’d love to talk over a good cup of coffee – and the coffee is on me!

To schedule a consultation or to book me for a workshop or speaking engagement, I can be reached at robert@tacticalsocialmedia.org.

Social Media Strategist | Consultant | Educator | Marketer | Speaker; Focused on HOW to leverage social media, not just master the platforms.I am a successful small business owner with more than 20 years of marketing and sales experience.  Using the same social media and traditional marketing techniques I leveraged to brand and drive revenue for my own businesses, I work with other small to medium sized business owners to do the same.  My methodology is based on my own practical experience leveraging inbound and outbound platforms with a revolutionary approach and philosophy.  My methods have been applied successfully to retail, service and non profit based organizations.

        You can follow me on Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Facebook Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Google+ Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; LinkedIn Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Pinterest Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Twitter Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; WordPress Blog  Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Instagram.                                         

Posted in Facebook, Marketing & Social Media | Tagged , , , ,

Facebook Changes Terms of Service for Photographers

I haven’t read anything on the new policy (as found on asmp.org) or snopes.com to even know if it’s true yet, but regardless, you are sharing content on a public site and doing so at the site’s discretion (they can ban or block you).  As long as you are on their system, using their servers, you are playing by their rules.  While it would never likely be the case your images could be sold by a third party due to copyright law, once you upload your images to a public site, there is always the risk of theft with you being left to find it and fight it.

Facebook Changes Terms of Service for Photographers http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_privacy

One option to avoid the risk is to host all of your own images, add watermarks (though they can be removed), modify meta tag data to allow you to easily catch a thief (of course I can use software to capture the image rather than save it directly), modify the image to make it less desirable to steal or any number of other options.

If hosted on your site with watermarks and good tags you can add a layer of protection against anyone.  To avoid ANY hassle on social media, simply share the link for the image rather than direct posting.  After all there is SEO value in this practice and it certainly helps drive eyes to YOUR owned content – what the goal of capitalizing on social media should be (part of the inbound funnel) for businesses looking to generate income.

It may or may not be true.  It may or may not be legal.  The bottom line, it is up to you to protect yourself and your content.  Share smart.

Your Turn

Any photographers want to weigh in on how they are protecting their images and thoughts?

Want to let me know what you’re thinking?  You can find this post and comment on Google+, LinkedIn and Facebook or simply Tweet your thoughts!  If you found this post helpful please share it as others might too.

_____________________________________________________________________________

To schedule a consultation or to book me for a workshop or speaking engagement, I can be reached at robert@tacticalsocialmedia.org.

Social Media Strategist | Consultant | Educator | Marketer | Speaker; Focused on HOW to leverage social media, not just master the platforms.I am a successful small business owner with more than 20 years of marketing and sales experience.  Using the same social media and traditional marketing techniques I leveraged to brand and drive revenue for my own businesses, I work with other small to medium sized business owners to do the same.  My methodology is based on my own practical experience leveraging inbound and outbound platforms with a revolutionary approach and philosophy.  My methods have been applied successfully to retail, service and non profit based organizations.

        You can follow me on Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Facebook Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Google+ Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; LinkedIn Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Pinterest Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Twitter Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; WordPress Blog  Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Instagram.                                   

Posted in Facebook, Marketing & Social Media | Tagged , , , ,

The Places and Pages Predicament

The Case for Businesses With Multiple Locations To Have Separate Place Pages On Facebook & Google Plus

In a recent discussion on whether Google+ allowed a brand page to be linked to individual location pages (for each of its physical locations) the question was posed as to why a business would risk losing control of its message by having multiple pages.

A company’s loss of control over its message or branding when utilizing multiple pages may increase as pages and managers are added, but unless it was being lax, that risk remains minimal.  I often equate an individual’s or brand’s online activity to the real world.  Under the premise that increase pages and managers add undue risk, why would a business want multiple physical locations?  Each location adds an element of risk to the message.  That risk is mitigated by protocols and policies.The Case for Businesses With Multiple Locations To Have Separate Place Pages On Facebook & Google Plus . In a recent discussion on whether Google+ allowed a brand page to be linked to individual location pages (for each of its physical locations) the question was posed as to why a business would risk losing control of its message by having multiple pages. @rnissenbaum

I can monitor the activities of multiple locations across several states simply by being hands on and involved as well as by leveraging a host of monitoring or brand reputation software tools.  In cases where I feel there is risk I can limit access to posting and changes to just myself or a handful of trusted colleagues.  With respect to G+ each page gets a separate, unique login eliminating ‘cross contamination’ and hi-jacking.  Random password changes require those that post to communicate with me prior to regaining access.  That communication allows reinforcement of the mission and what is expected, allowed or off-limits.  Having access to the page via a personal profile ensures a failsafe – not that it’s needed as I have the ability to assess the possibility of any threats based on regular interaction.

As to why I (or any) would want multiple pages:

Social Recommendation, Visibility and Personalization.

Social Recommendation: With sites like G+, Facebook and Yelp, individuals check in.  They tell their friends where they are.  They tag their friends. The very fact that someone is willing to check in is their seal of approval of that location, a de facto recommendation.  If the location doesn’t show, they either won’t check in OR they’ll add the place on their own (which actually creates a ‘place’ that I don’t control).

Visibility:  The effective frequency has traditionally been 7 – 8.  Personally I feel in the age of information inundation that number is significantly higher.  Multiple locations allowing those check-ins allows a business to leverage customer connections to increase visibility exponentially decreasing the time needed to be devoted by the marketing department to reach the optimal effective frequency.

Personalization.  While the goal of social media is to help drive your audience, whether it’s to a website, blog, email sign up form, a retail store or anywhere else, as marketers we often miss HOW to accomplish it.  Social media is designed to be social.  If my business can build a relationship with you that’s more than just casual small talk, if my business resonates with you on a personal level, you’re more likely to buy, recommend and return in the future.  My role as a social media manager is to make my business your friend; to be someone you want to invite to Sunday family dinner.  To do that I need to get close to you (the customer).  If I have multiple stores in multiple states, I cannot do that effectively from a single page.

I need to be able to connect with you based on your likes, interests, hobbies, the weather, etc.  While everyone in a particular region won’t necessarily share all of the same feelings, it’s likely that there will be plenty of overlap.  It’s likely that my customers in Texas will have fewer, if any, common points of interest with my customers in Washington.  Separate pages allow me to connect with customers in specific markets on a more personal level.  I can discuss local events, news, sports – what they care and are passionate about – those things that make the conversation personal.

While I can address local issue on a single brand page, only some of my posts will apply to a specific customers.  When I know most of what a page posts doesn’t relate to me, I’m less interested and tend more likely to check back now and again, if at all.  I may even hide or unfollow the business.   As a marketer, a customer that feels that way will be difficult to reach and nearly impossible to connect on a personal level.  As a father with 11 and 15-year-old sons I can tell you finding common activities and points of conversation isn’t easy.  One will always ‘tune out’.  While much of what we do is as a family, I structure time for each one individually.  That time is structured to their needs, wants and desires.  It creates a stronger bond between us.  I use that same philosophy within my social media campaigns.  (Remember my equation between the real and virtual worlds?)

Switching gears, there is a less emotional reason for multiple pages.  Some things simply don’t work in some markets.  That could be a product, a service, a marketing idea.  I’m not too sure I would open a surfing school in the middle of Kansas or teach ice fishing in Texas.  So why would I want to promote something nationally that only has limited appeal or only promote those items that have national appeal and limit my brand?

There will always be some risk in multiple locations.  It does mean more work to stay on top of those risks and monitor them.  The flip side allows for more exposure and personalization.  It’s a risk I feel is necessary and will happily undertake.

Your Turn

I’d love to hear your thoughts are the use of multiple pages.  Do you manage a business with more than one location?  What has your strategy been?  What have you found to work (and not work)?

Want to let me know what you’re thinking?  You can find this post and     comment on Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Facebook or simply Tweet your thoughts!  If you found this post helpful please share it as others might too. 

_______________________________________________________________________________

 

To schedule a consultation or to book me for a workshop or speaking engagement, I can be reached at robert@tacticalsocialmedia.org.

Social Media Strategist | Consultant | Educator | Marketer | Speaker; Focused on HOW to leverage social media, not just master the platforms.I am a successful small business owner with more than 20 years of marketing and sales experience.  Using the same social media and traditional marketing techniques I leveraged to brand and drive revenue for my own businesses, I work with other small to medium-sized business owners to do the same.  My methodology is based on my own practical experience leveraging inbound and outbound platforms with a revolutionary approach and philosophy.  My methods have been applied successfully to retail, service and non-profit based organizations.

        You can follow me on Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Facebook Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Google+ Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; LinkedIn Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Pinterest Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Twitter Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; WordPress Blog  Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Instagram.                                        

Posted in Facebook, Google +, Marketing & Social Media | Tagged , , , , , ,

The ReTweet Discreditation

The updated post and can be found at Tactical Social Media

We should all aware by now that what we post online, especially public content, will live forever.  What you post can have profound, long term effects.  Even a single post, tweet or comment can take on a life of its own.

Where am I going with this?  While it’s generally sunk in that we need to be careful WHAT we post, it seems that isn’t necessarily the case with what we REPOST.

Before you RT, repin or share that content – READ IT!

The #ReTweet Discreditation: Since our reputation is affected by what we post, both our own and curated content, it’s imperative that we read everything we intend to put our name and stamp of approval on, even if that takes time, regardless of the source.

I was dumbfound recently when I read an article that was heavily repinned and RT’d.  The content discussed how to drive more reach for your Facebook Fan Page and ultimately your website or blog.  Catchy headline, catchy image.  The issue was the actual content.  The author was advocating click baiting – something in itself I find unethical – but more importantly, something Facebook discussed in August: ‘Facebook is announcing the pursuit and war against attempts to entice clicks through headlines that are misleading.

I couldn’t believe so many people were sharing content that would actually HURT others in their social media efforts and was exactly what Facebook was working to stop!  Regardless of why the content was shared it was obvious it wasn’t read first (though I will concede that some share may have been from those that did read it and agreed with the Black Hat practice).

Since our reputation is affected by what we post, both our own and curated content, it’s imperative that we read everything we intend to put our name and stamp of approval on, even if that takes time, regardless of the source.

When discussing this topic with a colleague it was mentioned that content from a trusted source may need less scrutiny and maybe none.  It may be true that the source may will be far less likely to share or post such content, even the experts make mistakes.  It’s not just about whether the content is true, the link legit or the image authentic, it’s as much about what is said.

Sharing great content (even from a trusted source) doesn’t mean your reputation won’t come under fire.  Sharing content counter to your beliefs, what you advocate, what your followers / fan base expect can be just as damaging.  I have generally have no desire to share the content of even the best known / trusted social media or marketing experts (or experts in any field) if I do not agree with their position.  Would you give someone who’s views are counter to yours access to your audience?  Unless you’re looking for a debate, no.  Yet sharing their content on your social media profiles is doing just that.

The Take Away:

  • Read first, then share, regardless of the source and every time.
  • Don’t Share, repost or retweet without following any and all links.
  • Don’t repin without tracing the image back to its source.

It may take longer but a few minutes now can save your reputation.

Want to let me know what you’re thinking?  You can find this post and comment on LinkedIn, Google+Pinterest and Facebook or simply Tweet your thoughts!  If you found this post helpful please share it as others might too.

If you need help with Twitter (or have any other social media questions, thoughts, concerns, I’d love to talk over a good cup of coffee – the coffee is on me!

To schedule a consultation or to book me for a workshop or speaking engagement, I can be reached at robert@tacticalsocialmedia.org.

Social Media Strategist | Consultant | Educator | Marketer | Speaker; Focused on HOW to leverage social media, not just master the platforms.Robert Nissenbaum is a successful small business owner with more than 20 years of marketing and sales experience.  Using the same social media and traditional marketing techniques he leveraged to brand and drive revenue for his own businesses, he works with other small to medium sized business owners to do the same.  His methodology is based on his own practical experience leveraging inbound and outbound platforms with a revolutionary approach and philosophy.  His methods have been applied successfully to retail, service and non profit based organizations.

        Follow Robert: Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Facebook; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Google+; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; LinkedIn; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Pinterest; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Twitter; Tactical Social Media Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; WordPress Blog; Tactical Social Media  Robert Nissenbaum, social media strategist & consultant; Instagram; Tactical Social Media

Posted in Facebook, Marketing & Social Media, Pinterest, Twitter | Tagged , , , , ,